18 FEB 1975
I was in Dominica between Led Zeppelin tours

I went to Dominica between Led Zeppelin tours to meet up with beat poet Royston Ellis who was residing and writing in a building catering as a cricket pavilion, rum bar and living quarters in Mero outside the capital Roseau.
Dominica’s rum could be had straight up, with juices or with herb infusions. One of these brews was called Nani, another was called l’absinthe, with wormwood. I guess this was a follow through from the old French colonial rule and the penchant for absinthe. I have fond memories of the local ‘joy juice’.

18 FEB 1975

I was in Dominica between Led Zeppelin tours

I went to Dominica between Led Zeppelin tours to meet up with beat poet Royston Ellis who was residing and writing in a building catering as a cricket pavilion, rum bar and living quarters in Mero outside the capital Roseau.

Dominica’s rum could be had straight up, with juices or with herb infusions. One of these brews was called Nani, another was called l’absinthe, with wormwood. I guess this was a follow through from the old French colonial rule and the penchant for absinthe. I have fond memories of the local ‘joy juice’.

18 February 1975

18 February 1975

18 FEB 1975
I was in Dominica between Led Zeppelin tours

I went to Dominica between Led Zeppelin tours to meet up with beat poet Royston Ellis who was residing and writing in a building catering as a cricket pavilion, rum bar and living quarters in Mero outside the capital Roseau.
Dominica’s rum could be had straight up, with juices or with herb infusions. One of these brews was called Nani, another was called l’absinthe, with wormwood. I guess this was a follow through from the old French colonial rule and the penchant for absinthe. I have fond memories of the local ‘joy juice’.

18 FEB 1975

I was in Dominica between Led Zeppelin tours

I went to Dominica between Led Zeppelin tours to meet up with beat poet Royston Ellis who was residing and writing in a building catering as a cricket pavilion, rum bar and living quarters in Mero outside the capital Roseau.

Dominica’s rum could be had straight up, with juices or with herb infusions. One of these brews was called Nani, another was called l’absinthe, with wormwood. I guess this was a follow through from the old French colonial rule and the penchant for absinthe. I have fond memories of the local ‘joy juice’.

18 February 1975

18 February 1975